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Recently, one of my favorite shows, Hannibal, got canceled. It ran for three seasons on NBC and was, IMO, the edgiest show on network TV. At first, I didn't panic. This being 2015, it seems like every canceled show gets picked up by either a digital outlet like Yahoo, Hulu, Amazon or an analog cable network like USA or SyFy. But when the show finally released the actors from their contracts, I knew it was over.

Mindy Project Crap
How is this crap is worth saving, Hulu?!?
I like closure. I need it in my entertainment! Even if it's just, "And then they all walked into the sunset." Is that asking too much? Now, Hannibal will just be added to the list of shows, books, and TV shows that I've invested time into without a satisfying ending (except the movies).
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The visual representation of media without closure in my heart and mind.
The only silver lining to this is that Hannibal show creator, Bryan Fuller, is now involved in bringing Neil Gaiman's celebrated novel, American Gods, to the small screen in the form of a TV series. I personally love American Gods, and honestly most everything else Neil Gaiman writes. Although, the adaptations of his work can be hit and miss (see Mirrormask, actually, don't).
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That's how I felt watching Mirrormask...
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If you aren't familiar with American Gods, then stop reading now (well, after you're done with this post) and download it to your e-reader with haste! It's a great, sometimes trippy, road trip tale in which all of its characters are different gods from throughout world history that inhabit the bodies of normal humans whom are struggling to survive in modern day America. It's a touching, sad, and well-paced story that is up there with some of the best modern fiction written in the last 15 years.

If you don't know anything about Bryan Fuller, then let me school you a bit. Bryan Fuller got his start writing on Star Trek shows Voyager and DS9. While not the best stuff in Star Trek canon, it's a great place to start and gets one some major geek points.

He went on to create some of TV's most inventive, create and visually vibrant shows: Wonderfalls, Dead Like Me, and Pushing Daisies. All three of those shows, like Hannibal, got canceled in their primes. This guy can't seem to get past a third season... even though, I believe he is one of the most original voices in TV today. 
Now, if you've read American Gods and seen any of Bryan Fuller's shows, you'll realize like I have that this pairing is a match made in heaven. So expect to see some mind-bending montages, insane visual sequences and hear some thought provoking dialogue. While it's true, American Gods is only one book; I think this is a good thing. It leaves room for a writer like Bryan Fuller to expand on the original material and may provide him a limited number of seasons to create a full satisfying series, which his fans, like me have yearned for since we started our fandom for him.
Expect to see a review of the pilot when it hits the air on Starz next year.
 


Comments

09/29/2015 8:18am

I love Neil Gaiman. When I was younger, my favorite book was Stardust. I guess when you are young and idealistic, you still want that fairy tale romance of sorts. Well, even though, Gaiman has quite a darker twist in his story telling. Later on I moved on to Good Omens, which is just wonderful, if I might had. Having read this book, got me hooked on The Discworld Series by Terry Pratchett, who is his co-author. Now, I am into American Gods. I have just started the book, but it is so gripping and I love the archetypes. I know I might be late in reading as many Gaiman books as I could, but hey, I could still catch up and be part of his fandom :)

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10/16/2015 4:18pm

Have you read "The Alchemyst: The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel" by Michael Scott? If so, how does that series compare, in your opinion with "American Gods"? The concept appears similar in that Scott also takes the gods and demi-gods of history and keeps the story moving briskly enough that you don't have time for a lot of "Oh, come on!" moments. Gaiman's take looks more mature and angst-y, but I've not been much of a fan of his.

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